Hints will display for most wrong answers; explanations for most right answers.   You can attempt a question multiple times; it will only be scored correct if you get it right the first time.

I used the official objectives and sample test to construct these questions, but cannot promise that they accurately reflect what’s on the real test.   Some of the sample questions were more convoluted than I could bear to write.   See terms of use.   See the MTEL Practice Test main page to view questions on a particular topic or to download paper practice tests.

MTEL General Curriculum Mathematics Practice


Your answers are highlighted below.
Question 1

In each expression below  N represents a negative integer. Which expression could have a negative value?

A
\( \large {{N}^{2}}\)
Hint:
Squaring always gives a non-negative value.
B
\( \large 6-N\)
Hint:
A story problem for this expression is, if it was 6 degrees out at noon and N degrees out at sunrise, by how many degrees did the temperature rise by noon? Since N is negative, the answer to this question has to be positive, and more than 6.
C
\( \large -N\)
Hint:
If N is negative, then -N is positive
D
\( \large 6+N\)
Hint:
For example, if \(N=-10\), then \(6+N = -4\)
Question 1 Explanation: 
If you are stuck on a question like this, try a few examples to eliminate some choices and to help you understand what the question means. Topic: Characteristics of integers (Objective 0016).
Question 2

Given that 10 cm is approximately equal to 4 inches, which of the following expressions models a way to find out approximately how many inches are equivalent to 350 cm?

A
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{10}{4} \right)\)
Hint:
The final result should be smaller than 350, and this answer is bigger.
B
\( \large 350\times \left( \dfrac{4}{10} \right)\)
Hint:
Dimensional analysis can help here: \(350 \text{cm} \times \dfrac{4 \text{in}}{10 \text{cm}}\). The cm's cancel and the answer is in inches.
C
\( \large (10-4) \times 350 \)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
D
\( \large (350-10) \times 4\)
Hint:
This answer doesn't make much sense. Try with a simpler example (e.g. 20 cm not 350 cm) to make sure that your logic makes sense.
Question 2 Explanation: 
Topic: Applying fractions to word problems (Objective 0017) This problem is similar to one on the official sample test for that objective, but it might fit better into unit conversion and dimensional analysis (Objective 0023: Measurement)
Question 3

On a map the distance from Boston to Detroit is 6 cm, and these two cities are 702 miles away from each other. Assuming the scale of the map is the same throughout, which answer below is closest to the distance between Boston and San Francisco on the map, given that they are 2,708 miles away from each other?

A

21 cm

Hint:
How many miles would correspond to 24 cm on the map? Try adjusting from there.
B

22 cm

Hint:
How many miles would correspond to 24 cm on the map? Try adjusting from there.
C

23 cm

Hint:
One way to solve this without a calculator is to note that 4 groups of 6 cm is 2808 miles, which is 100 miles too much. Then 100 miles would be about 1/7 th of 6 cm, or about 1 cm less than 24 cm.
D

24 cm

Hint:
4 groups of 6 cm is over 2800 miles on the map, which is too much.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply proportional thinking to estimate quantities in real world situations (Objective 0019).
Question 4

Which of the numbers below is the decimal equivalent of \( \dfrac{3}{8}?\)

A

0.38

Hint:
If you are just writing the numerator next to the denominator then your technique is way off, but by coincidence your answer is close; try with 2/3 and 0.23 is nowhere near correct.
B

0.125

Hint:
This is 1/8, not 3/8.
C

0.375

D

0.83

Hint:
3/8 is less than a half, and 0.83 is more than a half, so they can't be equal.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Topic: Converting between fractions and decimals (Objective 0017)
Question 5

Here is a method that a student used for subtraction:

Which of the following is correct?

A

The student used a method that worked for this problem and can be generalized to any subtraction problem.

Hint:
Note that this algorithm is taught as the "standard" algorithm in much of Europe (it's where the term "borrowing" came from -- you borrow on top and "pay back" on the bottom).
B

The student used a method that worked for this problem and that will work for any subtraction problem that only requires one regrouping; it will not work if more regrouping is required.

Hint:
Try some more examples.
C

The student used a method that worked for this problem and will work for all three-digit subtraction problems, but will not work for larger problems.

Hint:
Try some more examples.
D

The student used a method that does not work. The student made two mistakes that cancelled each other out and was lucky to get the right answer for this problem.

Hint:
Remember, there are many ways to do subtraction; there is no one "right" algorithm.
Question 5 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze and justify standard and non-standard computational techniques (Objective 0019).
Question 6

How many lines of reflective symmetry and how many centers of rotational symmetry does the parallelogram depicted below have?

 
A

4 lines of reflective symmetry, 1 center of rotational symmetry.

Hint:
Try cutting out a shape like this one from paper, and fold where you think the lines of reflective symmetry are (or put a mirror there). Do things line up as you thought they would?
B

2 lines of reflective symmetry, 1 center of rotational symmetry.

Hint:
Try cutting out a shape like this one from paper, and fold where you think the lines of reflective symmetry are (or put a mirror there). Do things line up as you thought they would?
C

0 lines of reflective symmetry, 1 center of rotational symmetry.

Hint:
The intersection of the diagonals is a center of rotational symmetry. There are no lines of reflective symmetry, although many people get confused about this fact (best to play with hands on examples to get a feel). Just fyi, the letter S also has rotational, but not reflective symmetry, and it's one that kids often write backwards.
D

2 lines of reflective symmetry, 0 centers of rotational symmetry.

Hint:
Try cutting out a shape like this one from paper. Trace onto another sheet of paper. See if there's a way to rotate the cut out shape (less than a complete turn) so that it fits within the outlines again.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Topic: Analyze geometric transformations (e.g., translations, rotations, reflections, dilations); relate them to concepts of symmetry (Objective 0024).
Question 7

There are six gumballs in a bag — two red and four green.  Six children take turns picking a gumball out of the bag without looking.   They do not return any gumballs to the bag.  What is the probability that the first two children to pick from the bag pick the red gumballs?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{3}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that the first child picks a red gumball, but not that the first two children pick red gumballs.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8}\)
Hint:
Are you adding things that you should be multiplying?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{9}\)
Hint:
This would be the probability if the gumballs were returned to the bag.
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{15}\)
Hint:
The probability that the first child picks red is 2/6 = 1/3. Then there are 5 gumballs in the bag, one red, so the probability that the second child picks red is 1/5. Thus 1/5 of the time, after the first child picks red, the second does too, so the probability is 1/5 x 1/3 = 1/15.
Question 7 Explanation: 
Topic: Calculate the probabilities of simple and compound events and of independent and dependent events (Objective 0026).
Question 8

The least common multiple of 60 and N is 1260. Which of the following could be the prime factorization of N?

A
\( \large2\cdot 5\cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is divisible by 9 and 60 is not, so N must be divisible by 9 for 1260 to be the LCM.
B
\( \large{{2}^{3}}\cdot {{3}^{2}}\cdot 5 \cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is not divisible by 8, so it isn't a multiple of this N.
C
\( \large3 \cdot 5 \cdot 7\)
Hint:
1260 is divisible by 9 and 60 is not, so N must be divisible by 9 for 1260 to be the LCM.
D
\( \large{{3}^{2}}\cdot 5\cdot 7\)
Hint:
\(1260=2^2 \cdot 3^2 \cdot 5 \cdot 7\) and \(60=2^2 \cdot 3 \cdot 5\). In order for 1260 to be the LCM, N has to be a multiple of \(3^2\) and of 7 (because 60 is not a multiple of either of these). N also cannot introduce a factor that would require the LCM to be larger (as in choice b).
Question 8 Explanation: 
Topic: Least Common Multiple (Objective 0018)
Question 9

The table below gives data from various years on how many young girls drank milk.

Based on the data given above, what was the probability that a randomly chosen girl in 1990 drank milk?

A
\( \large \dfrac{502}{1222}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen girl who drinks milk was in the 1989-1991 food survey.
B
\( \large \dfrac{502}{2149}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen girl from the whole survey drank milk and was also surveyed in 1989-1991.
C
\( \large \dfrac{502}{837}\)
D
\( \large \dfrac{1222}{2149}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen girl from any year of the survey drank milk.
Question 9 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply the concept of conditional probability (Objective 0026).
Question 10

What is the probability that two randomly selected people were born on the same day of the week?  Assume that all days are equally probable.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{7}\)
Hint:
It doesn't matter what day the first person was born on. The probability that the second person will match is 1/7 (just designate one person the first and the other the second). Another way to look at it is that if you list the sample space of all possible pairs, e.g. (Wed, Sun), there are 49 such pairs, and 7 of them are repeats of the same day, and 7/49=1/7.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{14}\)
Hint:
What would be the sample space here? Ie, how would you list 14 things that you pick one from?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{42}\)
Hint:
If you wrote the seven days of the week on pieces of paper and put the papers in a jar, this would be the probability that the first person picked Sunday and the second picked Monday from the jar -- not the same situation.
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{49}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that they are both born on a particular day, e.g. Sunday.
Question 10 Explanation: 
Topic: Calculate the probabilities of simple and compound events and of independent and dependent events (Objective 0026).
Question 11

Below are four inputs and outputs for a function machine representing the function A:

Which of the following equations could also represent A  for the values shown?

A
\( \large A(n)=n+4\)
Hint:
For a question like this, you don't have to find the equation yourself, you can just try plugging the function machine inputs into the equation, and see if any values come out wrong. With this equation n= -1 would output 3, not 0 as the machine does.
B
\( \large A(n)=n+2\)
Hint:
For a question like this, you don't have to find the equation yourself, you can just try plugging the function machine inputs into the equation, and see if any values come out wrong. With this equation n= 2 would output 4, not 6 as the machine does.
C
\( \large A(n)=2n+2\)
Hint:
Simply plug in each of the four function machine input values, and see that the equation produces the correct output, e.g. A(2)=6, A(-1)=0, etc.
D
\( \large A(n)=2\left( n+2 \right)\)
Hint:
For a question like this, you don't have to find the equation yourself, you can just try plugging the function machine inputs into the equation, and see if any values come out wrong. With this equation n= 2 would output 8, not 6 as the machine does.
Question 11 Explanation: 
Topics: Understand various representations of functions, and translate among different representations of functional relationships (Objective 0021).
Question 12

Which of the numbers below is not equivalent to 4%?

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{25}\)
Hint:
1/25=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
B
\( \large \dfrac{4}{100}\)
Hint:
4/100=4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
C
\( \large 0.4\)
Hint:
0.4=40% so this is not equal to 4%
D
\( \large 0.04\)
Hint:
0.04=4/100, so this is equal to 4% (be sure you read the question correctly).
Question 12 Explanation: 
Converting between fractions, decimals, and percents (Objective 0017).
Question 13

The first histogram shows the average life expectancies for women in different countries in Africa in 1998; the second histogram gives similar data for Europe:

  

How much bigger is the range of the data for Africa than the range of the data for Europe?

A

0 years

Hint:
Range is the maximum life expectancy minus the minimum life expectancy.
B

12 years

Hint:
Are you subtracting frequencies? Range is about values of the data, not frequency.
C

18 years

Hint:
It's a little hard to read the graph, but it doesn't matter if you're consistent. It looks like the range for Africa is 80-38= 42 years and for Europe is 88-64 = 24; 42-24=18.
D

42 years

Hint:
Read the question more carefully.
Question 13 Explanation: 
Topic: Compare different data sets (Objective 0025).
Question 14

A sales companies pays its representatives $2 for each item sold, plus 40% of the price of the item.   The rest of the money that the representatives collect goes to the company.  All transactions are in cash, and all items cost $4 or more.   If the price of an item in dollars is p, which expression represents the amount of money the company collects when the item is sold?

A
\( \large \dfrac{3}{5}p-2\)
Hint:
The company gets 3/5=60% of the price, minus the $2 per item.
B
\( \large \dfrac{3}{5}\left( p-2 \right)\)
Hint:
This is sensible, but not what the problem states.
C
\( \large \dfrac{2}{5}p+2\)
Hint:
The company pays the extra $2; it doesn't collect it.
D
\( \large \dfrac{2}{5}p-2\)
Hint:
This has the company getting 2/5 = 40% of the price of each item, but that's what the representative gets.
Question 14 Explanation: 
Topic: Use algebra to solve word problems involving fractions, ratios, proportions, and percents (Objective 0020).
Question 15

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows.

 

Which of the following is a correct equation for the graph of the line depicted above?

 
A
\( \large y=-\dfrac{1}{2}x+2\)
Hint:
The slope is -1/2 and the y-intercept is 2. You can also try just plugging in points. For example, this is the only choice that gives y=1 when x=2.
B
\( \large 4x=2y\)
Hint:
This line goes through (0,0); the graph above does not.
C
\( \large y=x+2\)
Hint:
The line pictured has negative slope.
D
\( \large y=-x+2\)
Hint:
Try plugging x=4 into this equation and see if that point is on the graph above.
Question 15 Explanation: 
Topic: Find a linear equation that represents a graph (Objective 0022).
Question 16

Here is a student€™s work solving an equation:

\( x-4=-2x+6\)

\( x-4+4=-2x+6+4\)

\( x=-2x+10\)

\( x-2x=10\)

\( x=10\)

Which of the following statements is true?

A

The student‘s solution is correct.

Hint:
Try plugging into the original solution.
B

The student did not correctly use properties of equality.

Hint:
After \( x=-2x+10\), the student subtracted 2x on the left and added 2x on the right.
C

The student did not correctly use the distributive property.

Hint:
Distributive property is \(a(b+c)=ab+ac\).
D

The student did not correctly use the commutative property.

Hint:
Commutative property is \(a+b=b+a\) or \(ab=ba\).
Question 16 Explanation: 
Topic: Justify algebraic manipulations by application of the properties of equality, the order of operations, the number properties, and the order properties (Objective 0020).
Question 17

What is the mathematical name of the three-dimensional polyhedron depicted below?

A

Tetrahedron

Hint:
All the faces of a tetrahedron are triangles.
B

Triangular Prism

Hint:
A prism has two congruent, parallel bases, connected by parallelograms (since this is a right prism, the parallelograms are rectangles).
C

Triangular Pyramid

Hint:
A pyramid has one base, not two.
D

Trigon

Hint:
A trigon is a triangle (this is not a common term).
Question 17 Explanation: 
Topic: Classify and analyze three-dimensional figures using attributes of faces, edges, and vertices (Objective 0024).
Question 18

Which of the following points is closest to \( \dfrac{34}{135} \times \dfrac{53}{86}\)?

A

A

Hint:
\(\frac{34}{135} \approx \frac{1}{4}\) and \( \frac{53}{86} \approx \frac {2}{3}\). \(\frac {1}{4}\) of \(\frac {2}{3}\) is small and closest to A.
B

B

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
C

C

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
D

D

Hint:
Estimate with simpler fractions.
Question 18 Explanation: 
Topic: Understand meaning and models of operations on fractions (Objective 0019).
Question 19

Cell phone plan A charges $3 per month plus $0.10 per minute. Cell phone plan B charges $29.99 per month, with no fee for the first 400 minutes and then $0.20 for each additional minute.

Which equation can be used to solve for the number of minutes, m (with m>400) that a person would have to spend on the phone each month in order for the bills for plan A and plan B to be equal?

A
\( \large 3.10m=400+0.2m\)
Hint:
These are the numbers in the problem, but this equation doesn't make sense. If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
B
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20m\)
Hint:
Doesn't account for the 400 free minutes.
C
\( \large 3+0.1m=400+29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
Why would you add 400 minutes and $29.99? If you don't know how to make an equation, try plugging in an easy number like m=500 minutes to see if each side equals what it should.
D
\( \large 3+0.1m=29.99+.20(m-400)\)
Hint:
The left side is $3 plus $0.10 times the number of minutes. The right is $29.99 plus $0.20 times the number of minutes over 400.
Question 19 Explanation: 
Identify variables and derive algebraic expressions that represent real-world situations (Objective 0020).
Question 20

Use the table below to answer the question that follows:

Each number in the table above represents a value W that is determined by the values of x and y.  For example, when x=3 and y=1, W=5.  What is the value of W when x=9 and y=14?  Assume that the patterns in the table continue as shown.

A
\( \large W=-5\)
Hint:
When y is even, W is even.
B
\( \large W=4\)
Hint:
Note that when x increases by 1, W increases by 2, and when y increases by 1, W decreases by 1. At x=y=0, W=0, so at x=9, y=14, W has increased by \(9 \times 2\) and decreased by 14, or W=18-14=4.
C
\( \large W=6\)
Hint:
Try fixing x or y at 0, and start by finding W for x=0 y=14 or x=9, y=0.
D
\( \large W=32\)
Hint:
Try fixing x or y at 0, and start by finding W for x=0 y=14 or x=9, y=0.
Question 20 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and extend patterns using a variety of representations (e.g., verbal, numeric, pictorial, algebraic) (Objective 0021)
Question 21

Which of the graphs below represent functions?

I. II. III. IV.   
A

I and IV only.

Hint:
There are vertical lines that go through 2 points in IV .
B

I and III only.

Hint:
Even though III is not continuous, it's still a function (assuming that vertical lines between the "steps" do not go through 2 points).
C

II and III only.

Hint:
Learn about the vertical line test.
D

I, II, and IV only.

Hint:
There are vertical lines that go through 2 points in II.
Question 21 Explanation: 
Understand the definition of function and various representations of functions (e.g., input/output machines, tables, graphs, mapping diagrams, formulas). (Objective 0021).
Question 22

The Venn Diagram below gives data on the number of seniors, athletes, and vegetarians in the student body at a college:

How many students at the college are seniors who are not vegetarians?

A
\( \large 137\)
Hint:
Doesn't include the senior athletes who are not vegetarians.
B
\( \large 167\)
C
\( \large 197\)
Hint:
That's all seniors, including vegetarians.
D
\( \large 279\)
Hint:
Includes all athletes who are not vegetarians, some of whom are not seniors.
Question 22 Explanation: 
Topic: Venn Diagrams (Objective 0025)
Question 23

Use the expression below to answer the question that follows.

                 \( \large \dfrac{\left( 4\times {{10}^{3}} \right)\times \left( 3\times {{10}^{4}} \right)}{6\times {{10}^{6}}}\)

Which of the following is equivalent to the expression above?

A

2

Hint:
\(10^3 \times 10^4=10^7\), and note that if you're guessing when the answers are so closely related, you're generally better off guessing one of the middle numbers.
B

20

Hint:
\( \dfrac{\left( 4\times {{10}^{3}} \right)\times \left( 3\times {{10}^{4}} \right)}{6\times {{10}^{6}}}=\dfrac {12 \times {{10}^{7}}}{6\times {{10}^{6}}}=\)\(2 \times {{10}^{1}}=20 \)
C

200

Hint:
\(10^3 \times 10^4=10^7\)
D

2000

Hint:
\(10^3 \times 10^4=10^7\), and note that if you're guessing when the answers are so closely related, you're generally better off guessing one of the middle numbers.
Question 23 Explanation: 
Topics: Scientific notation, exponents, simplifying fractions (Objective 0016, although overlaps with other objectives too).
Question 24

Kendra is trying to decide which fraction is greater, \(  \dfrac{4}{7}\) or \(  \dfrac{5}{8}\). Which of the following answers shows the best reasoning?

A

\( \dfrac{4}{7}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{7}\)away from 1, and \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is \( \dfrac{3}{8}\)away from 1. Since eighth‘s are smaller than seventh‘s, \( \dfrac{5}{8}\) is closer to 1, and is the greater of the two fractions.

B

\( 7-4=3\) and \( 8-5=3\), so the fractions are equal.

Hint:
Not how to compare fractions. By this logic, 1/2 and 3/4 are equal, but 1/2 and 2/4 are not.
C

\( 4\times 8=32\) and \( 7\times 5=35\). Since \( 32<35\) , \( \dfrac{5}{8}<\dfrac{4}{7}\)

Hint:
Starts out as something that works, but the conclusion is wrong. 4/7 = 32/56 and 5/8 = 35/56. The cross multiplication gives the numerators, and 35/56 is bigger.
D

\( 4<5\) and \( 7<8\), so \( \dfrac{4}{7}<\dfrac{5}{8}\)

Hint:
Conclusion is correct, logic is wrong. With this reasoning, 1/2 would be less than 2/100,000.
Question 24 Explanation: 
Topics: Comparing fractions, and understanding the meaning of fractions (Objective 0017).
Question 25

A family has four children.  What is the probability that two children are girls and two are boys?  Assume the the probability of having a boy (or a girl) is 50%.

A
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{4}\)
Hint:
How many different configurations are there from oldest to youngest, e.g. BGGG? How many of them have 2 boys and 2 girls?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{5}\)
Hint:
Some configurations are more probable than others -- i.e. it's more likely to have two boys and two girls than all boys. Be sure you are weighting properly.
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{8}\)
Hint:
There are two possibilities for each child, so there are \(2 \times 2 \times 2 \times 2 =16\) different configurations, e.g. from oldest to youngest BBBG, BGGB, GBBB, etc. Of these configurations, there are 6 with two boys and two girls (this is the combination \(_{4}C_{2}\) or "4 choose 2"): BBGG, BGBG, BGGB, GGBB, GBGB, and GBBG. Thus the probability is 6/16=3/8.
Question 25 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply knowledge of combinations and permutations to the computation of probabilities (Objective 0026).
Question 26

Which of the following nets will not fold into a cube?

A
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
B
C
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
D
Hint:
If you have trouble visualizing, cut them out and fold (during the test, you can tear paper to approximate).
Question 26 Explanation: 
Topic: Match three-dimensional figures and their two-dimensional representations (e.g., nets, projections, perspective drawings) (Objective 0024).
Question 27

A homeowner is planning to tile the kitchen floor with tiles that measure 6 inches by 8 inches.  The kitchen floor is a rectangle that measures 10 ft by 12 ft, and there are no gaps between the tiles.  How many tiles does the homeowner need?

A

30

Hint:
The floor is 120 sq feet, and the tiles are smaller than 1 sq foot. Also, remember that 1 sq foot is 12 \(\times\) 12=144 sq inches.
B

120

Hint:
The floor is 120 sq feet, and the tiles are smaller than 1 sq foot.
C

300

Hint:
Recheck your calculations.
D

360

Hint:
One way to do this is to note that 6 inches = 1/2 foot and 8 inches = 2/3 foot, so the area of each tile is 1/2 \(\times\) 2/3=1/3 sq foot, or each square foot of floor requires 3 tiles. The area of the floor is 120 square feet. Note that the tiles would fit evenly oriented in either direction, parallel to the walls.
Question 27 Explanation: 
Topic: Estimate and calculate measurements, use unit conversions to solve measurement problems, solve measurement problems in real-world situations (Objective 0023).
Question 28

The table below gives the result of a survey at a college, asking students whether they were residents or commuters:

Based on the above data, what is the probability that a randomly chosen commuter student is a junior or a senior?

 
A
\( \large \dfrac{34}{43}\)
B
\( \large \dfrac{34}{71}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen junior or senior is a commuter student.
C
\( \large \dfrac{34}{147}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen student is a junior or senior who is a commuter.
D
\( \large \dfrac{71}{147}\)
Hint:
This is the probability that a randomly chosen student is a junior or a senior.
Question 28 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and apply the concept of conditional probability (Objective 0026).
Question 29

Which of the following is the equation of a linear function?

A
\( \large y={{x}^{2}}+2x+7\)
Hint:
This is a quadratic function.
B
\( \large y={{2}^{x}}\)
Hint:
This is an exponential function.
C
\( \large y=\dfrac{15}{x}\)
Hint:
This is an inverse function.
D
\( \large y=x+(x+4)\)
Hint:
This is a linear function, y=2x+4, it's graph is a straight line with slope 2 and y-intercept 4.
Question 29 Explanation: 
Topic: Distinguish between linear and nonlinear functions (Objective 0022).
Question 30

Use the graph below to answer the question that follows:

 

The graph above best matches which of the following scenarios:

A

George left home at 10:00 and drove to work on a crooked path. He was stopped in traffic at 10:30 and 10:45. He drove 30 miles total.

Hint:
Just because he ended up 30 miles from home doesn't mean he drove 30 miles total.
B

George drove to work. On the way to work there is a little hill and a big hill. He slowed down for them. He made it to work at 11:15.

Hint:
The graph is not a picture of the roads.
C

George left home at 10:15. He drove 10 miles, then realized he‘d forgotten something at home. He turned back and got what he‘d forgotten. Then he drove in a straight line, at many different speeds, until he got to work around 11:15.

Hint:
A straight line on a distance versus time graph means constant speed.
D

George left home at 10:15. He drove 10 miles, then realized he‘d forgotten something at home. He turned back and got what he‘d forgotten. Then he drove at a constant speed until he got to work around 11:15.

Question 30 Explanation: 
Topic: Use qualitative graphs to represent functional relationships in the real world (Objective 0021).
Question 31

The histogram below shows the frequency of a class€™s scores on a 4 question quiz.

What was the mean score on the quiz?

A
\( \large 2.75\)
Hint:
There were 20 students who took the quiz. Total points earned: \(2 \times 1+6 \times 2+ 7\times 3+5 \times 4=55\), and 55/20 = 2.75.
B
\( \large 2\)
Hint:
How many students are there total? Did you count them all?
C
\( \large 3\)
Hint:
How many students are there total? Did you count them all? Be sure you're finding the mean, not the median or the mode.
D
\( \large 2.5\)
Hint:
How many students are there total? Did you count them all? Don't just take the mean of 1, 2, 3, 4 -- you have to weight them properly.
Question 31 Explanation: 
Topics: Analyze and interpret various graphic representations, and use measures of central tendency (e.g., mean, median, mode) and spread to describe and interpret real-world data (Objective 0025).
Question 32

In which table below is y a function of x?

A
Hint:
If x=3, y can have two different values, so it's not a function.
B
Hint:
If x=3, y can have two different values, so it's not a function.
C
Hint:
If x=1, y can have different values, so it's not a function.
D
Hint:
Each value of x always corresponds to the same value of y.
Question 32 Explanation: 
Topic: Understand the definition of function and various representations of functions (e.g., input/output machines, tables, graphs, mapping diagrams, formulas) (Objective 0021).
Question 33

Solve for x: \(\large 4-\dfrac{2}{3}x=2x\)

A
\( \large x=3\)
Hint:
Try plugging x=3 into the equation.
B
\( \large x=-3\)
Hint:
Left side is positive, right side is negative when you plug this in for x.
C
\( \large x=\dfrac{3}{2}\)
Hint:
One way to solve: \(4=\dfrac{2}{3}x+2x\) \(=\dfrac{8}{3}x\).\(x=\dfrac{3 \times 4}{8}=\dfrac{3}{2}\). Another way is to just plug x=3/2 into the equation and see that each side equals 3 -- on a multiple choice test, you almost never have to actually solve for x.
D
\( \large x=-\dfrac{3}{2}\)
Hint:
Left side is positive, right side is negative when you plug this in for x.
Question 33 Explanation: 
Topic: Solve linear equations (Objective 0020).
Question 34

In the triangle below, \(\overline{AC}\cong \overline{AD}\cong \overline{DE}\) and \(m\angle CAD=100{}^\circ \).  What is \(m\angle DAE\)?

A
\( \large 20{}^\circ \)
Hint:
Angles ACD and ADC are congruent since they are base angles of an isosceles triangle. Since the angles of a triangle sum to 180, they sum to 80, and they are 40 deg each. Thus angle ADE is 140 deg, since it makes a straight line with angle ADC. Angles DAE and DEA are base angles of an isosceles triangle and thus congruent-- they sum to 40 deg, so are 20 deg each.
B
\( \large 25{}^\circ \)
Hint:
If two sides of a triangle are congruent, then it's isosceles, and the base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal.
C
\( \large 30{}^\circ \)
Hint:
If two sides of a triangle are congruent, then it's isosceles, and the base angles of an isosceles triangle are equal.
D
\( \large 40{}^\circ \)
Hint:
Make sure you're calculating the correct angle.
Question 34 Explanation: 
Topic: Classify and analyze polygons using attributes of sides and angles, including real-world applications. (Objective 0024).
Question 35

Which of the following is equivalent to \(  \dfrac{3}{4}-\dfrac{1}{8}+\dfrac{2}{8}\times \dfrac{1}{2}?\)

A
\( \large \dfrac{7}{16}\)
Hint:
Multiplication comes before addition and subtraction in the order of operations.
B
\( \large \dfrac{1}{2}\)
Hint:
Addition and subtraction are of equal priority in the order of operations -- do them left to right.
C
\( \large \dfrac{3}{4}\)
Hint:
\( \dfrac{3}{4}-\dfrac{1}{8}+\dfrac{2}{8}\times \dfrac{1}{2}\)=\( \dfrac{3}{4}-\dfrac{1}{8}+\dfrac{1}{8}\)=\( \dfrac{3}{4}+-\dfrac{1}{8}+\dfrac{1}{8}\)=\( \dfrac{3}{4}\)
D
\( \large \dfrac{3}{16}\)
Hint:
Multiplication comes before addition and subtraction in the order of operations.
Question 35 Explanation: 
Topic: Operations on Fractions, Order of Operations (Objective 0019).
Question 36

The following story situations model \( 12\div 3\):

I)  Jack has 12 cookies, which he wants to share equally between himself and two friends.  How many cookies does each person get?

II) Trent has 12 cookies, which he wants to put into bags of 3 cookies each.  How many bags can he make?

III) Cicely has $12.  Cookies cost $3 each.  How many cookies can she buy?

Which of these questions illustrate the same model of division, either partitive (partioning) or measurement (quotative)?

A

I and II

B

I and III

C

II and III

Hint:
Problem I is partitive (or partitioning or sharing) -- we put 12 objects into 3 groups. Problems II and III are quotative (or measurement) -- we put 12 objects in groups of 3.
D

All three problems model the same meaning of division

Question 36 Explanation: 
Topic: Understand models of operations on numbers (Objective 0019).
Question 37

Which of the following values of x satisfies the inequality \( \large \left| {{(x+2)}^{3}} \right|<3?\)

A
\( \large x=-3\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(-3+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {(-1)}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | -1 \right |=1 \) .
B
\( \large x=0\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(0+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {2}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | 8 \right | \) =\( 8\)
C
\( \large x=-4\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(-4+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {(-2)}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | -8 \right | \) =\( 8\)
D
\( \large x=1\)
Hint:
\( \left| {{(1+2)}^{3}} \right|\)=\( \left | {3}^3 \right | \)=\( \left | 27 \right | \) = \(27\)
Question 37 Explanation: 
Topics: Laws of exponents, order of operations, interpret absolute value (Objective 0019).
Question 38

A teacher has a list of all the countries in the world and their populations in March 2012.  She is going to have her students use technology to compute the mean and median of the numbers on the list.   Which of the following statements is true?

A

The teacher can be sure that the mean and median will be the same without doing any computation.

Hint:
Does this make sense? How likely is it that the mean and median of any large data set will be the same?
B

The teacher can be sure that the mean is bigger than the median without doing any computation.

Hint:
This is a skewed distribution, and very large countries like China and India contribute huge numbers to the mean, but are counted the same as small countries like Luxembourg in the median (the same thing happens w/data on salaries, where a few very high income people tilt the mean -- that's why such data is usually reported as medians).
C

The teacher can be sure that the median is bigger than the mean without doing any computation.

Hint:
Think about a set of numbers like 1, 2, 3, 4, 10,000 -- how do the mean/median compare? How might that relate to countries of the world?
D

There is no way for the teacher to know the relative size of the mean and median without computing them.

Hint:
Knowing the shape of the distribution of populations does give us enough info to know the relative size of the mean and median, even without computing them.
Question 38 Explanation: 
Topic: Use measures of central tendency (e.g., mean, median, mode) and spread to describe and interpret real-world data (Objective 0025).
Question 39

What is the greatest common factor of 540 and 216?

A
\( \large{{2}^{2}}\cdot {{3}^{3}}\)
Hint:
One way to solve this is to factor both numbers: \(540=2^2 \cdot 3^3 \cdot 5\) and \(216=2^3 \cdot 3^3\). Then take the smaller power for each prime that is a factor of both numbers.
B
\( \large2\cdot 3\)
Hint:
This is a common factor of both numbers, but it's not the greatest common factor.
C
\( \large{{2}^{3}}\cdot {{3}^{3}}\)
Hint:
\(2^3 = 8\) is not a factor of 540.
D
\( \large{{2}^{2}}\cdot {{3}^{2}}\)
Hint:
This is a common factor of both numbers, but it's not the greatest common factor.
Question 39 Explanation: 
Topic: Find the greatest common factor of a set of numbers (Objective 0018).
Question 40

If  x  is an integer, which of the following must also be an integer?

A
\( \large \dfrac{x}{2}\)
Hint:
If x is odd, then \( \dfrac{x}{2} \) is not an integer, e.g. 3/2 = 1.5.
B
\( \large \dfrac{2}{x}\)
Hint:
Only an integer if x = -2, -1, 1, or 2.
C
\( \large-x\)
Hint:
-1 times any integer is still an integer.
D
\(\large\sqrt{x}\)
Hint:
Usually not an integer, e.g. \( \sqrt{2} \approx 1.414 \).
Question 40 Explanation: 
Topic: Integers (Objective 0016)
Question 41

The chairs in a large room can be arranged in rows of 18, 25, or 60 with no chairs left over. If C is the smallest possible number of chairs in the room, which of the following inequalities does C satisfy?

A
\( \large C\le 300\)
Hint:
Find the LCM.
B
\( \large 300 < C \le 500 \)
Hint:
Find the LCM.
C
\( \large 500 < C \le 700 \)
Hint:
Find the LCM.
D
\( \large C>700\)
Hint:
The LCM is 900, which is the smallest number of chairs.
Question 41 Explanation: 
Topic: Apply LCM in "real-world" situations (according to standardized tests....) (Objective 0018).
Question 42

The expression \( \large {{7}^{-4}}\cdot {{8}^{-6}}\) is equal to which of the following?

A
\( \large \dfrac{8}{{{\left( 56 \right)}^{4}}}\)
Hint:
The bases are whole numbers, and the exponents are negative. How can the numerator be 8?
B
\( \large \dfrac{64}{{{\left( 56 \right)}^{4}}}\)
Hint:
The bases are whole numbers, and the exponents are negative. How can the numerator be 64?
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8\cdot {{\left( 56 \right)}^{4}}}\)
Hint:
\(8^{-6}=8^{-4} \times 8^{-2}\)
D
\( \large \dfrac{1}{64\cdot {{\left( 56 \right)}^{4}}}\)
Question 42 Explanation: 
Topics: Laws of exponents (Objective 0019).
Question 43

Below is a pictorial representation of \(2\dfrac{1}{2}\div \dfrac{2}{3}\):

Which of the following is the best description of how to find the quotient from the picture?

A

The quotient is \(3\dfrac{3}{4}\). There are 3 whole blocks each representing \(\dfrac{2}{3}\) and a partial block composed of 3 small rectangles. The 3 small rectangles represent \(\dfrac{3}{4}\) of \(\dfrac{2}{3}\).

B

The quotient is \(3\dfrac{1}{2}\). There are 3 whole blocks each representing \(\dfrac{2}{3}\) and a partial block composed of 3 small rectangles. The 3 small rectangles represent \(\dfrac{3}{6}\) of a whole, or \(\dfrac{1}{2}\).

Hint:
We are counting how many 2/3's are in
2 1/2: the unit becomes 2/3, not 1.
C

The quotient is \(\dfrac{4}{15}\). There are four whole blocks separated into a total of 15 small rectangles.

Hint:
This explanation doesn't make much sense. Probably you are doing "invert and multiply," but inverting the wrong thing.
D

This picture cannot be used to find the quotient because it does not show how to separate \(2\dfrac{1}{2}\) into equal sized groups.

Hint:
Study the measurement/quotative model of division. It's often very useful with fractions.
Question 43 Explanation: 
Topic: Recognize and analyze pictorial representations of number operations. (Objective 0019).
Question 44

Use the solution procedure below to answer the question that follows:

\( \large {\left( x+3 \right)}^{2}=10\)

\( \large \left( x+3 \right)\left( x+3 \right)=10\)

\( \large {x}^{2}+9=10\)

\( \large {x}^{2}+9-9=10-9\)

\( \large {x}^{2}=1\)

\( \large x=1\text{ or }x=-1\)

Which of the following is incorrect in the procedure shown above?

A

The commutative property is used incorrectly.

Hint:
The commutative property is \(a+b=b+a\) or \(ab=ba\).
B

The associative property is used incorrectly.

Hint:
The associative property is \(a+(b+c)=(a+b)+c\) or \(a \times (b \times c)=(a \times b) \times c\).
C

Order of operations is done incorrectly.

D

The distributive property is used incorrectly.

Hint:
\((x+3)(x+3)=x(x+3)+3(x+3)\)=\(x^2+3x+3x+9.\)
Question 44 Explanation: 
Topic: Justify algebraic manipulations by application of the properties of equality, the order of operations, the number properties, and the order properties (Objective 0020).
Question 45

Which of the following is an irrational number?

A
\( \large \sqrt[3]{8}\)
Hint:
This answer is the cube root of 8. Since 2 x 2 x 2 =8, this is equal to 2, which is rational because 2 = 2/1.
B
\( \large \sqrt{8}\)
Hint:
It is not trivial to prove that this is irrational, but you can get this answer by eliminating the other choices.
C
\( \large \dfrac{1}{8}\)
Hint:
1/8 is the RATIO of two integers, so it is rational.
D
\( \large -8\)
Hint:
Negative integers are also rational, -8 = -8/1, a ratio of integers.
Question 45 Explanation: 
Topic: Identifying rational and irrational numbers (Objective 0016).
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